Bird Flight – Soaring again (Overcoming mental health challenges)

seagull gliding
Bird Flight

Yesterday I woke up refreshed from a trip to the sunny south, kind of like a much needed winter migration vacation. The light and warmth seemed to recharge my energy and soul. For the first time in ages I got into the car and drove. I stopped here and there, and it seemed like everywhere on a special new found mission. Even though I eventually returned home, I didn’t feel like I drove “back” to any place. Instead, it was like a one-way ride heading forward for a change.  My front door was like the entrance to a new house and inside I didn’t head to any old safe nook. I explored new rooms, walked around different corners. Saw things I never before recalled seeing.  Continue reading

Using my blog as a place to work on my memoir

writing keeps me sane

About four years ago, I decided that an online class of some sort would be good for me. I haven’t been able to work for a long time because of my mental illness, and other than chores and errands, which I sometimes struggle(d) with, I’ve only been able to do limited things on the computer. The first online class I took was one on memoir writing. I was happy that added something new and enriching in my life. It also made me toy with the idea of writing a memoir of my own. I am a neophyte when it comes to such ambitious writing projects, but not so new to writing short stories. Continue reading

Eating delightful foods in life – Major and simple pleasures

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Photo taken by my late nephew, whose life was stolen from us far too soon.

We spend most of our days consuming edible foods in life, but how often do we consume those that are truly delightful or nicely satisfying? What is delightful to one is not necessarily delightful to another, but when it is it brings a smile to our face, we feel more than just satiated. Of course I’m not writing strictly about food here, though of course that can play a part. What I’m mainly writing about are things that give us pleasure. Continue reading

My 1st through 10th painful psychiatric incarcerations (Part 4 of 4)

depression falling down

Please consider reading Part 1, Part 2, and Part 3 of this four part post series before continuing with this post, though this post can be of interest all alone.

***Some content in this post may be disturbing or triggering. This post primarily focuses on a major depressive episode of Bipolar disorder type 1***

At the end of Part 3 of this post series, I had attended my eighth out of 10 hospitalizations for mania and/or mania with mixed features, and was again in an Intensive Outpatient Program (IOP). The remaining major depressive episode eased briefly. I had improved sufficiently enough to return back to work part-time and resume care under my private psychiatrist, Dr. Ripley.

Only two months later, the depressive episode worsened to severe, but there were no hints of mania involved. Continue reading

Efforts to take control of your illness

Control sign
The Hope sign is bigger than the Despair sign, and points to the sun.

Taking control of an illness is possible for many, to various degrees, but anyone who has had a serious illness knows control isn’t always that easy. It takes work and often support from various people in your life. Sometimes control doesn’t necessarily mean curing the problem, but just lessening the symptoms and the illness progression. Continue reading

Wounds need time and extra care to really heal

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For a wound to truly heal one must give it the proper time, attention, and treatment. Being too quick to stop the treatment and remove the bandage only leaves it vulnerable to opening up again.

I wrote the above quote referring to all kinds of wounds. Physical wounds, wounds of the heart, and the wounds we suffer from mental strife or illness.

bandages-908873_960_720In the past, after being hurt or wounded by one thing or another, I used to be quick to end treatment and “move on”. I’d try to ignore what had happened when it seemed superficially healed. But deep down the wound would fester, in a sense, even if it had a normal appearance. Sometimes I was hardly aware of the fact, but wondered why I was not feeling 100%. I’d eventually be reminded of that hurt in a greater way, or there would be a scar left years later because of improper treatment. If the wound again showed itself more greatly, perhaps I’d quick treat it a second or third time and move on again, but eventually I’d have to deal with it properly. Only then did it truly heal. Let’s be sure not to leave wounds improperly treated forever.

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